Top 5 Reasons Why Bone Broth is The Bomb!

Top 5 Reasons Why Bone Broth is The Bomb!

by Sean Croxton
www.undergroundwellness.com

This stuff is awesome.

Never in my life did I imagine I’d be so head over heels about a soup made from bones.

I guess you can say I have quite the man crush on the rich, brown liquid that fills my coffee cup each morning.

It makes me feel warm inside, and puts a little pep in my step.

And oh my, is it tasty!

But my fondness for bone broth goes well beyond its taste and warmth. There’s a reason why it’s called the magic elixir — and it’s a darn shame that more people aren’t drinking it.

There was a time, not long ago, when bone broth was a part of just about every meal we consumed in this country, as it provided the base for soups, gravies, and stews. Unfortunately, with the disappearance of the local butcher as well as the invention of brain-cell-killing MSG — which gave processed foods an artificial meaty flavor — preparing broth became a lost art.

These days, very few of us even know what it is, or why we should be consuming it.

So today I thought I’d share with you my own personal Top 5 Reasons Why Bone Broth is The Bomb. Here we go!

Reason #1: Bone Broth Makes Your Joints Feel as Smooth as Eggs.

Yes, that was a Dave Chappelle reference. If you don’t get it, don’t worry about it.

Anyway…

In her ridiculously awesome book Deep Nutrition, Dr. Cate Shanahan writes…

“The health of your joints depends upon the health of the collagen in your ligaments, tendons, and on the ends of your bones. Collagens are a large family of biomolecules, which include the glycosaminoglycans, very special molecules that help keep our joints healthy.”

Bone broth is loaded with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In fact, I’m absolutely certain that you’ve heard of one of them — glucosamine. Yep, those supplements that seemingly everyone is taking for joint health contain one of the GAGs we get from consuming bone broth.

You know me, I’m a food-first kind of guy. Here’s just one of the reasons why I prefer Real Food over supplementation…

Notice I said that glucosamine is just one of the GAGs contained in bone broth. When you consume broth you also get chondroitin, hyaluronic acid, and likely a bunch of other equally important GAGs that have yet to be discovered.

What’s more, the GAGs we get from bone broth are resistant to digestion and are absorbed in their intact form. According to Dr. Cate, these intact GAGs like hormones, stimulating cells called fibroblasts which lay down collagen in the joints, tendons, ligaments, and even the arteries.

I can personally attest to the joint-healing benefits of bone broth. Before I began drinking it regularly, I had been dealing with a lingering dull pain in my left shoulder. After about a week and a half of daily consumption, the pain completely vanished. My knees feel much better when running stairs as well.

It’s truly powerful stuff!

Reason #2: Bone Broth Makes Your Hair, Skin, and Nails Look Dead Sexy.

I know people who, in a quest to recapture a youthful appearance, will pay top dollar for products that boost collagen — also the main constituent of hair, skin, and nails.

As we age, production of collagen declines and we start to see the outward signs of aging.

Out here in San Diego (Land of The Beautiful), botox — a drug made from a toxin produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum — is all the craze for the reduction of lines and wrinkles.

That’s kinda weird, in my opinion. And expensive.

Personally, I’d much rather prepare and consume bone broth to keep my skin, hair (if I had any), and nails looking fabulous than have a toxin injected into my face.

But that’s just me.

(By the way, broth is super cheap to make on your own.)

Reason #3: Bone Broth Heals Your Gut!

Let’s keep it real. Most people reading this blog right now are experiencing some kind of gastrointestinal challenge — constipation, diarrhea, food sensitivities, leaky gut, or even autoimmune disease.

One of the most vital nutrients for healing the gut is gelatin. Yep, the stuff that makes the Jell-O jiggle.

There was a time when gelatin was the most studied nutrient under the sun for all of its healing virtues. Times have certainly changed.

To make a long story short, the intestinal lining is supposed to be permeable in order for nutrients to pass through. However, this lining can become too permeable due to lifestyle factors such as poor diet, stress, long-term contraceptive use, as well as bacterial and fungal overgrowths. Just think of poking huge holes in your window screens at home. Yes, the good air will pass through, but the flies, gnats, and mosquitoes will too.

This is how leaky gut — or gut hyperpermeability — works. Undigested food particles can slip through the gut lining and pass directly into the bloodstream. No bueno! When this happens, the immune system freaks out and starts attacking the very foods you eat — we call these food sensitivities.

Over time, this can turn into an autoimmune issue by which your immune system thinks your thyroid — or any other tissue, for that matter — looks like the piece of steak molecule it’s been fighting off for the past few years. In other words, your body starts to attack itself.

According to our good friend Dr. Thomas O’Bryan, autoimmunity will soon be the number one cause of death in this country. Gut hyperpermeability is a big reason why.

What does bone broth have to do with any of this? Well, the gelatin in bone broth spackles the excess holes in the gut lining, so to speak. It’s quite the handyman, and should be part of any gut-healing protocol.

Reason #4: Bone Broth Reduces Your Need for Meat and Protein.

This is pretty darn interesting. In her fantastic Real Food Summit (RFS) presentation, Sarah Pope revealed that studies conducted in the 1800s demonstrated that when there is plenty of gelatin in the diet, the body’s need for protein from meat sources can be reduced by as much as fifty-percent!

We all know that purchasing quality meats can be hard on the wallet. The good news is that you can make bone broth for dirt cheap and thus save money on meat.

Not a bad deal.

Reason #5: Bone Broth Helps Get the Toxins Out.

Here’s another golden nugget from Mrs. Pope. The liver is the master organ of detoxification. Unfortunately, it was never intended to withstand the very toxic, chemical nature of today’s world.

The liver is certainly under assault on a daily basis, and its capacity to detoxify is limited by the availability of the amino acid glycine.

Guess where you can get tons of glycine from? Bone broth, baby!

For now, forget about all the fancy detox programs you’ve heard about. Do your liver a favor by giving it what it needs to do its job most effectively.

Gosh, I can go on and on with this blog. The benefits of consuming bone broth are endless. That’s why it’s the bomb.

Andrew is a co-owner of Fit Crew Bradenton. He attended Lansing Community College before beginning the Blue Heron Academy for Exercise Science and has more than 10 years experience as a trainer. He has a background in holistic health and wellness and is a Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist. He is the nutritionist for the Colombian Davis Cup Team and has provided nutrition programming to a multitude of professional athletes. He was featured on the CNN HLN Daily Share for his client’s 62 pound weight loss and the recipient of the 2013 and 2015 Bradenton Herald’s Best of Bradenton in the Nutritionist category. He is certified by the American Council on Exercise (ACE), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the USAW as a strength and conditioning coach
Why Grains Are Unhealthy

Why Grains Are Unhealthy

I find that grain bashing makes for a tasty, but ultimately unsatisfying meal.
You all know how much I love doing it, though. But no matter how often I sit down to dine on the stuff (and I’ve done it with great gusto in the past), I always leave the table feeling like I left something behind. Like maybe I wasn’t harsh enough about the danger of gluten, or I failed to really convey just how much I hated lectins. If I didn’t know better, I’d think the mere mention of grains was eliciting a crazy insulin-esque response and throwing my satiety hormones all out of whack. I was filling up on anti-grain talk, but I just couldn’t fill that void for long.
Well, I’ve got the hunger today, and this time I aim to stuff myself to the point of perpetual sickness. I don’t ever want to have to look at another anti-grain argument again (yeah, right). If things get a little disjointed, or if I descend into bullet points and sentence fragments, it’s only because the hunger has taken over and I’ve decided to dispense with the pleasantries in order to lay it all out at once.

So please, bear with me.
Apart from maintaining social conventions in certain situations and obtaining cheap sugar calories, there is absolutely no reason to eat grains. Believe me – I’ve searched far and wide and asked everyone I can for just one good reason to eat cereal grains, but no one can do it. They may have answers, but they just aren’t good enough. For fun, though, let’s see take a look at some of the assertions:
“You need the fiber!”
Okay, for one: no, I don’t. If you’re referring to its oft-touted ability to move things along in the inner sanctum, fiber has some unintended consequences. A few years back, scientists found that high-fiber foods “bang up against the cells lining the gastrointestinal tract, rupturing their outer covering” which “increases the level of lubricating mucus.” Err, that sounds positively awful. Banging and tearing? Rupturing? These are not the words I like to hear. But wait! The study’s authors say, “It’s a good thing.” Fantastic! So when all those sticks and twigs rub up against my fleshy interior and literally rupture my intestinal lining, I’ve got nothing to worry about. It’s all part of the plan, right?
Somehow, I’m not convinced that a massive daily infusion of insoluble grain fiber is all that essential. And that “lubricating mucus” sounds an awful like the mucus people with irritable bowel syndrome complain about. From personal experience I can tell you that once I completed my exodus from grains, the IBS completely stopped. If you’re not yet convinced on the fiber issue I’ll refer you to Konstantin Monastyrsky’s Fiber Menace. Anyway, there’s plenty of fiber in the vegetables and fruit I eat. Which takes me to the next claim:
“You need the vitamins and minerals!”
You got me. I do need vitamins and minerals, like B1 and B2, magnesium and iron, zinc and potassium. But do I need to obtain them by eating a carb-heavy, bulky grain? No, no I don’t. You show me a serving of “healthy whole grains” that can compete – nutrient, vitamin, and mineral-wise – with a Big Ass Salad. What’s that? Can’t do it? Thought so.
“But it forms the foundation of the governmental food pyramid!”
You know, I should have just started the entire post with this one. I could have saved my fingers the trouble of typing and your eyes the trouble of reading. Governmental endorsements are not points in your favor, grain-eater; they are strikes against you. An appeal to authority (unless that “authority” is actually a preponderance of scientific evidence, of course) does not an effective argument make. Conventional Wisdom requires consistent, steady dissection and criticism if it is to be of any value.
There’s a reason grains are first and foremost on the list of foods to avoid when following the Primal Blueprint: they are completely and utterly pointless in the context of a healthy diet. In fact, if your average unhealthy person were to ask for the top three things to avoid in order to get healthy, I would tell them to stop smoking, to stop drinking their calories (as soda or juice), and to stop eating grains. Period. Full stop. They really are that bad.
I’ve mentioned this time and again, but the fundamental problem with grains is that they are a distinctly Neolithic food that the human animal has yet to adapt to consuming. In fact, cereal grains figured prominently in the commencement of the New Stone Age; grains were right there on the forefront of the agricultural revolution. Hell, they were the agricultural revolution – einkorn wheat, emmer, millet, and spelt formed the backbone of Neolithic farming. They could be stored for months at a time, they were easy enough to grow in massive enough quantities to support a burgeoning population, and they promoted the construction of permanent settlements. Oh, and they were easily hoarded, meaning they were probably an early form of currency (and, by extension, a potential source of income inequality). And here’s the kicker: they were harsh, tough things that probably didn’t even taste very good. It also took a ton of work just to make them edible, thanks to their toxic anti-nutrients.
Toxic anti-nutrients? Do tell.
Living things generally do not want to be consumed by other living things. Being digested, for the most part, tends to interrupt survival, procreation, propagation of the species – you know, standard stuff that fauna and flora consider pretty important. To avoid said consumption, living things employ various self defense mechanisms. Rabbits, for example, with their massive ears, considerable fast-twitch muscle fibers, and nasty claws, can usually hear a predator coming, outrun (out-hop?) nearly anything, and (in a pinch) slash a tender belly to shreds. Blue whales are too big to fit into your mouth, while porcupines are walking reverse pincushions. Point is, animals have active defense mechanisms. They run, fight, jump, climb, fly, sting, bite, and even appeal to our emotions (if you’ve ever seen a puppy beg for a treat with sad eyes, you know that isn’t just accidental cuteness) in order to survive. All the while, predators are constantly evolving and generating adaptations.
Plants, though, are passive organisms without the ability to move, think, and react (for the most part). They must employ different tactics to ensure propagation, and they generally have to rely on outside forces to spread their seed. And so various methods are “devised” to dissuade consumption long enough for the seed to get to where it’s going. Nuts have those tough shells, and grains have the toxic anti-nutrients, lectins, gluten, and phytates. (Of course there are some obvious exceptions. Fruits are tasty, nutritious, and delicious so that animals will eat them whole and poop out the seeds, preferably into some fertile soil. The seed stays intact throughout the digestive process; it is indigestible by design. No seed “wants” to be digested, because this would defeat the purpose. They “want” to be swallowed, or borne by the wind, or carried by a bee to the next flower, but they do not want to be digested.)
Some animals are clearly adapted to grain consumption. Birds, rodents, and some insects can deal with the anti-nutrients. Humans, however, cannot. Perhaps if grains represented a significant portion of our ancestral dietary history, things might be a bit different. Some of us can digest dairy, and we’ve got the amylase enzyme present in our saliva to break down starches if need be, but we simply do not have the wiring necessary to mitigate the harmful effects of lectins, gluten, and phytate.
Lectins are bad. They bind to insulin receptors, attack the stomach lining of insects, bind to human intestinal lining, and they seemingly cause leptin resistance. And leptin resistance predicts a “worsening of the features of the metabolic syndrome independently of obesity”. Fun stuff, huh?
Gluten might be even worse. Gluten, found in wheat, rye, and barley, is a composite of the proteins gliadin and glutenin. Around 1% of the population are celiacs, people who are completely and utterly intolerant of any gluten. In celiacs, any gluten in the diet can be disastrous. We’re talking compromised calcium and vitamin D3 levels, hyperparathyroidism, bone defects. Really terrible stuff. And it gets worse: just because you’re not celiac doesn’t mean you aren’t susceptible to the ravages of gluten. As Stephan highlights, one study showed that 29% of asymptomatic (read: not celiac) people nonetheless tested positive for anti-gliadin IgA in their stool. Anti-gliadin IgA is an antibody produced by the gut, and it remains there until it’s dispatched to ward off gliadin – a primary component of gluten. Basically, the only reason anti-gliadin IgA ends up in your stool is because your body sensed an impending threat – gluten. If gluten poses no threat, the anti-gliadin IgA stays in your gut. And to think, most Americans eat this stuff on a daily basis.
Phytates are a problem, too, because they make minerals bio-unavailable (so much for all those healthy vitamins and minerals we need from whole grains!), thus rendering null and void the last, remaining argument for cereal grain consumption.
What, then, is the point to all this grain madness? Is there a good reason for anyone (with access to meat, fruit, and vegetables, that is) to rely on cereal grains for a significant portion of their caloric intake?
The answer is unequivocally, undeniably no. We do not need grains to survive, let alone thrive. In fact, they are naturally selected to ward off pests, whether they be insects or hominids. I suggest we take the hint and stop eating them.
And with that, I’m done. I don’t think I could eat another bite.

Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-grains-are-unhealthy/#ixzz2cRGGa4lv

Andrew is a co-owner of Fit Crew Bradenton. He attended Lansing Community College before beginning the Blue Heron Academy for Exercise Science and has more than 10 years experience as a trainer. He has a background in holistic health and wellness and is a Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist. He is the nutritionist for the Colombian Davis Cup Team and has provided nutrition programming to a multitude of professional athletes. He was featured on the CNN HLN Daily Share for his client’s 62 pound weight loss and the recipient of the 2013 and 2015 Bradenton Herald’s Best of Bradenton in the Nutritionist category. He is certified by the American Council on Exercise (ACE), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the USAW as a strength and conditioning coach
Pulse: Top 12 Healthiest Foods

Pulse: Top 12 Healthiest Foods

These dynamic dozen are “perhaps the most nutritionally dense, bang-for-your-buck super foods nature has to offer,” according to functional diagnostic nutritionist and trainer Andrew Terman of Bradenton’s Fit Crew. “There are many more powerful foods naturally available, but here are the 12 highlights.”

1. Organic Pastured (not pasteurized) Eggs “Just one egg contains nine essential amino acids—the highest-quality protein you can find,” says Terman.

2. Kale Beneficial to your stomach, liver, lungs and immune system. Also an excellent source of nutrients including vitamins A, B, and C, calcium and iron.

3. Wild Alaskan Salmon High levels of the essential, animal-based omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA—nutrients that are significantly lacking in most Americans’ diets.

4. Organic Grass-Fed Kefir Boosts immunity and increases energy. Fermentation adds a ton of beneficial micro-organisms, making the food easier to digest and helping your body maintain balanced, healthy “gut flora,” says Terman.

5. Avocado Most Americans are seriously deficient in the kind of healthful fat that’s abundant in avocados. They also provide fiber, potassium (twice the amount of a banana), Vitamin E, and more.

6. Organic Coconut Oil Half of the fat content in coconut oil is lauric acid—a fat rarely found in nature. Your body converts lauric acid into monolaurin, which has anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-protozoa properties. Coconut oil can also increase the activity of your thyroid.

7. Blueberries Of all berries, blueberries contain the most potent antioxidants. And blueberries are very high in fiber and relatively low in calories.

8. Organic Grass-Fed Butter Believe it: “Butter is an excellent source of nutrients,” says Terman, including vitamin A, copper, selenium, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and healthful fats that boost metabolism and are required for healthy brain and skin function.

9. Grass-fed Beef Grass-fed beef contains exponentially more omega 3 fats than regular beef and averages about 100 fewer calories (per six-ounce serving).

10. Macadamia Nuts Among the healthiest nuts, offering protein, fiber and many other vitamins and minerals, plus the best ratio of omega-3 (good fat) to omega-6 (bad fat) of any nut.

11. Broccoli Incredibly rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, low in calories.

12. Whey protein A byproduct of milk and cheese, whey protein concentrate is a rich source of amino acids. It’s also the best food for maximizing your glutathione (“the master antioxidant”) levels. To be the proper quality, whey protein must be derived from grass-fed cows, cold pressed, free of hormones, chemicals, artificial sweeteners and sugar.

See original article at sarasotamagazine.com as Sarasota Magazine gets the scoop on nutrition from Andrew Terman:  http://sarasotamagazine.com/blog/2012/10/01/pulse-top-12-healthiest-foods/

Andrew is a co-owner of Fit Crew Bradenton. He attended Lansing Community College before beginning the Blue Heron Academy for Exercise Science and has more than 10 years experience as a trainer. He has a background in holistic health and wellness and is a Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist. He is the nutritionist for the Colombian Davis Cup Team and has provided nutrition programming to a multitude of professional athletes. He was featured on the CNN HLN Daily Share for his client’s 62 pound weight loss and the recipient of the 2013 and 2015 Bradenton Herald’s Best of Bradenton in the Nutritionist category. He is certified by the American Council on Exercise (ACE), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the USAW as a strength and conditioning coach